About the area:

Lansing, IA is located on the Mississippi River about 35 miles south of La Crosse, Wi. It's historic downtown with great restaurants and interesting shops will bring you back time after time. Visit MyLansingIowa.com for more information. MyLansingIowa.com

With the Mississippi River and wildlife refuge at our doorstep plan to spend a little time visiting the area and enjoy the beauty and scenic drive along The River. To our south you will find a scenic drive along The River into McGregor/Marquette with a good destination of Guttenberg- about an hour from Lansing. To our North, about 1 hr from Lansing explore the scenic drive with a recommended destination of Winona and don't forget to see the Maritime Museum in Winona.

Books About The River

Vestiges of Grandeur: Plantations of Louisiana’s River Road

In an evocative sequel to the acclaimed New Orleans: Elegance and Decadence, author and photographer Richard Sexton returns with an in-depth visual journey through the hidden mansions—some inhabited, many now long abandoned—of Louisiana's River Road. Bordering the Mississippi, these antebellum landmarks were once the epitome of gracious living in the Deep South. Over the past century, these grand dwellings have slowly succumbed to time, humidity, and the reclamation of the land: first by nature, then by real-estate developers who built subdivisions, oil refineries, and strip malls where curtains of Spanish moss once swayed from the live oaks. This collection—featuring over 200 haunting color photographs with extensive captions explaining the architectural significance and history of each structure—is a beautiful elegy for a rapidly disappearing landscape and its ghosts.

Nauvoo: Mormon City on the Mississippi River

In 1839, persecuted Mormons fled Missouri, across the Mississippi
River, seeking freedom from violence. They hoped to find a safe
haven on the banks of the river in an Illinois city that they called
Nauvoo, "the city beautiful."

The Mormons did not flourish for long in Nauvoo. In neighboring
cities some grew resentful of the prosperity that Joseph Smith and
his people were enjoying. Religious misconceptions further fueled
hostility toward the Mormons. Would the oft-persecuted Mormons
have to flee their city beautiful?
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Mark Twain : Mississippi Writings : Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi, Huckleberry Finn, Pudd’nhead Wilson (Library of America)

Here for the first time in one volume are the most famous and characteristic of Mark Twain's works. Through each of them runs the powerful and majestic Mississippi. The river represented for Twain the complex and contradictory possibilities in his own and the nation's life: the place where civilization's comforts meet the violence and promise of freedom of the frontier. It was the place, too, where Twain's youthful innocence confronted the grim reality of slavery. The nostalgic re-creation of childhood in "Tom Sawyer"–"simply a hymn put into prose form to give it a worldly air," said Twain–and the richly anecdotal memoir of his days as a riverboat pilot in "Life on the Mississippi" give way to the realism and often dark comedy of "Huckleberry Finn" and the troubled exploration of slavery in his mystery, "Pudd'nhead Wilson." Together, these four books trace the central trajectory of his life and career, and they can be read as a single masterpiece.

The Old-Time River Rats: Tales of Bygone Days along the Wild Mississippi

Colorful characters once populated the Upper Mississippi River Valley swamps and floodplain forests. These are the river rats, hill folk, and swamp dogs whose stories Kenny Salwey tells so well. Now long gone, these legendary denizens of the river bottoms come alive in Kenny’s signature brand of storytelling, rife with insight and laughter, woodslore and a time-tested philosophy of the natural world. With a foreword by regional historian Gary Schlosstein, this deep delving into the old-time community of the Mississippi River presents a rich picture of a life as fascinating as it is fast-disappearing in our fast-paced, high-tech world.

The Mississippi: America’s Mighty River (Rivers Around the World)

Life on the Mississippi

The Mississippi River and Mark Twain are practically synonymous in American culture. Known as ''America 's river,'' the popularity of Twain's steamboat and steamboat pilot on the ever-changing Mississippi has endured for over a century.

A brilliant amalgam of remembrance and reportage, by turns satiric, celebratory, nostalgic, and melancholy, Life on the Mississippi evokes the great river that Mark Twain knew as a boy and young man and the one he revisited as a mature and successful author. Written between the publication of his two greatest novels, Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, Twain's rich portrait of the Mississippi marks a distinctive transition in the life of the river and the nation, from the boom years preceding the Civil War to the sober times that followed it.
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The Last River Rat: Kenny Salwey’s Life in the Wild

Kenny Salwey is a modern-day American hermit who has lived most of his life in the Mississippi river bottoms, coming to know the river ecosystem with an intimacy unavailable to most. Now, Kenny shares his love of, and knowledge about, the mighty river. The Last River Rat is a seasonal look at Kenny’s unique life. Each chapter covers a month of Kenny’s year and starts by detailing his activities—such as deer hunting, ginseng digging, or mushroom picking—and closes with one of Kenny’s own "Rat Tales": his personal thoughts on various aspects of his way of life, such as the importance of dogs or memories of other river rats with whom he has crossed paths. Through Kenny—a true naturalist who provides sage advice about living off the land and protecting the river’s ecology—and The Last River Rat, you’ll gain a greater appreciation for the natural world.

The Mississippi : and the Making of a Nation

On a map, the Mississippi River cuts America neatly in half coursing from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico and separating East from West. But the Mississippi is in fact the “spine of our nation,” says Stephen Ambrose. It knits the nation together and connects the heartland to the world. It is our great natural wonder, a priceless treasure bought for a fledgling America by the visionary Thomas Jefferson just 200 years ago.

Distinguished historians Stephen Ambrose and Douglas Brinkley, with acclaimed National Geographic photographer Sam Abell, explore the length of the Mississippi—from its mouth at Delacroix Island, Louisiana, to its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. The result is this lavish, entertaining, engrossing chronicle of the “father of the waters,” which has shaped the history, the culture, and the very landscape of America.
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A Treasury Of Mississippi River Folklore: Stories, Ballads and Traditions of the Mid-American River Country

The Thousand-Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi Disaster of 1937

In the early days of 1937, the Ohio River, swollen by heavy winter rains, began rising. And rising. And rising. By the time the waters crested, the Ohio and Mississippi had climbed to record heights. Nearly four hundred people had died, while a million more had run from their homes. The deluge caused more than half a billion dollars of damage at a time when the Great Depression still battered the nation.

Timed to coincide with the flood's seventy-fifth anniversary, The Thousand-Year Flood is the first comprehensive history of one of the most destructive disasters in American history. David Welky first shows how decades of settlement put Ohio valley farms and towns at risk and how politicians and planners repeatedly ignored the dangers. Then he tells the gripping story of the river's inexorable rise: residents fled to refugee camps and higher ground, towns imposed martial law, prisoners rioted, Red Cross nurses endured terrifying conditions, and FDR dispatched thousands of relief workers. In a landscape fraught with dangers—from unmoored gas tanks that became floating bombs to powerful currents of filthy floodwaters that swept away whole towns—people hastily raised sandbag barricades, piled into overloaded rowboats, and marveled at water that stretched as far as the eye could see. In the flood's aftermath, Welky explains, New Deal reformers, utopian dreamers, and hard-pressed locals restructured not only the flood-stricken valleys, but also the nation's relationship with its waterways, changes that continue to affect life along the rivers to this day.
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It Happened on the Mississippi River (It Happened In Series)

Thirty stories from the history of the Mighty Mississippi River from Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico.

Minn of the Mississippi

The history of the Mississippi River Valley is told in text and pictures through the adventures of Minn, a snapping turtle, as she travels downstream.

Rivers of the United States, Vol 4: The Mississippi River: Parts A and B (2 Vol. Set) (Rivers of the United States) (Volume 4)

This text is the fourth volume (in two parts) of a six-volume set of books that provides a comprehensive and integrated treatment of all the major rivers and estuaries of the contiguous United States. Both the physical and biological characteristics of pristine river environments are presented in detail. Part A is concerned with west of the Mississippi basin drainage and west of the Mississippi River. Part B is concerned with east of the Mississippi basin drainage, east of the river and the draining into the Gulf of Mexico.

The Mississippi River in 1953: A Photographic Journey from the Headwaters to the Delta

The Mississippi River flows through American history and culture as a mythic waterway brimming with tragedy and hope, and awash in passionate ambitions and harsh realities. In 1953, a young Charles Dee Sharp traveled twice down the Mississippi (first by towboat and then by car along the renowned river road Highway 61) to make a documentary film of it, taking black-and-white photographs of the river, its communities, and its people.

While Sharp’s documentary never came to fruition, the striking images he captured survived as moving and evocative historical testaments to a lost era, now collected in his new book The Mississippi in 1953. These images create a vivid portrait of America’s heartland a half century ago, and they are enriched with excerpts from Sharp’s original trip journal, intriguing anecdotes from the people he encountered along his journey, and an engaging environmental history of the river by historian John O. Anfinson. The Mississippi in 1953 offers an original and poignant look at the living artery of the American landscape and how it molded the United States into the nation it is today.

A Projectile Point Guide for the Upper Mississippi River Valley (Bur Oak Guide)

Available December 2003 The most common relics of the 12,000-year occupancy of the Upper Mississippi River Valley may be the chipped stone projectile points that Native Americans fastened to the ends of their spears, darts, and arrow shafts. This useful guide provides a key to identifying the various styles of points found along the Upper Mississippi River in the Driftless region stretching roughly from Dubuque, Iowa, to Red Wing, Minnesota, but framed within a somewhat larger area extending from the Rock Island Rapids at the modern Moline-Rock Island area to the Falls of St. Anthony at Minneapolis-St. Paul.
Logging tens of thousands of miles and visiting private collectors from all walks of life since 1982, Robert Boszhardt has documented thousands of projectile points found in this region. In addition to drawings of each style, he provides other accepted names as well as names of related points, age, distribution, a description (including length and width), material, and references for each type. The guide is meant for the many avocational archaeologists who collect projectile points in the Upper Midwest and will be a useful reference tool for professional field archaeologists as well.
Emphasizing the preservation of sites as well as a mutual exchange of information between professional and avocational archaeologists, this guide will reveal projectile points as clues to the past, time markers which embody crucial information about the cultures of the Mississippi River Valley's early inhabitants.

Lost Plantations of the South

The great majority of the South's plantation homes have been destroyed over time, and many have long been forgotten. In Lost Plantations of the South, Marc R. Matrana weaves together photographs, diaries and letters, architectural renderings, and other rare documents to tell the story of sixty of these vanquished estates and the people who once called them home.

From plantations that were destroyed by natural disaster such as Alabama's Forks of Cypress, to those that were intentionally demolished such as Seven Oaks in Louisiana and Mount Brilliant in Kentucky, Matrana resurrects these lost mansions. Including plantations throughout the South as well as border states, Matrana carefully tracks the histories of each from the earliest days of construction to the often contentious struggles to preserve these irreplaceable historic treasures. Lost Plantations of the South explores the root causes of demise and provides understanding and insight on how lessons learned in these sad losses can help prevent future preservation crises. Capturing the voices of masters and mistresses alongside those of slaves, and featuring more than one hundred elegant archival illustrations, this book explores the powerful and complex histories of these cardinal homes across the South.

Mississippi River Gunboats of the American Civil War 1861-65 (New Vanguard)

At the start of the American Civil War, neither side had warships on the Mississippi River and in the first few months both sides scrambled to gather a flotilla, converting existing riverboats for naval use. These ships were transformed into powerful naval weapons despite a lack of resources, trained manpower and suitable vessels. The creation of a river fleet was a miracle of ingenuity, improvisation and logistics, particularly for the South. This title describes their design, development and operation throughout the American Civil War.

Thunder Along the Mississippi: The River Battles That Split The Confederacy

The squat river gunboats of the Civil War may have lacked the sleek majesty of oceangoing frigates, but undoubtedly they helped hammer home the North's victory as they successfully blasted their way up and down the Mississippi River. Jack D. Coombe presents the definitive account of these ironclad and wood-hulled warriors in the young country's western waterways, including the campaigns against Fort Donelson, New Orleans, and Vicksburg. The Union essentially built an inland navy, which pounded the Confederacy's heavily fortified towns and tried to dodge its mines. (Interesting piece of trivia: the Star of the West, the merchant ship attacked by Confederate batteries as it tried to reinforce Fort Sumter in January 1861 [the first hostile shots of the war], was later captured by Texans and converted into a rebel river steamboat.) Coombe argues that Federal control of the Mississippi made the South's defeat inevitable. His case is convincing, and his book is attractive–it includes dozens of black-and-white photos, plus several maps. It's one of the best naval histories of the Civil War available. –John J. Miller

The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of the Mississippi and Its Peoples from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina

In The Big Muddy, the first long-term environmental history of the Mississippi, Christopher Morris offers a brilliant tour across five centuries as he illuminates the interaction between people and the landscape, from early hunter-gatherer bands to present-day industrial and post-industrial society.

Morris shows that when Hernando de Soto arrived at the lower Mississippi Valley, he found an incredibly vast wetland, forty thousand square miles of some of the richest, wettest land in North America, deposited there by the big muddy river that ran through it. But since then much has changed, for the river and for the surrounding valley. Indeed, by the 1890s, the valley was rapidly drying. Morris shows how centuries of increasingly intensified human meddling–including deforestation, swamp drainage, and levee construction–led to drought, disease, and severe flooding. He outlines the damage done by the introduction of foreign species, such as the Argentine nutria, which escaped into the wild and are now busy eating up Louisiana's wetlands. And he critiques the most monumental change in the lower Mississippi Valley–the reconstruction of the river itself, largely under the direction of the Army Corps of Engineers. Valley residents have been paying the price for these human interventions, most visibly with the disaster that followed Hurricane Katrina. Morris also describes how valley residents have been struggling to reinvigorate the valley environment in recent years–such as with the burgeoning catfish and crawfish industries–so that they may once again live off its natural abundance.
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The Mississippi River Border to Border Panoramas & Impressions

A photographic voyage of the Mississippi River as it winds its way through the nation. Covering the 10 river states from the headwaters in Lake Itasca, Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois, this book features the river in its many phases from the variant blue to the muddy brown or the reddish glow around sunsets and sunrises. Start your journey of discovery through these beautiful vistas of America's River, through the lens and pens of Dr. Abdul Sinno of Dubuque, Iowa and sons Rafic and Omar. It's the perfect gift for any occasion!

The Mississippi River

The Mississippi River

Mississippi River Country Tales: A Celebration of 500 Years of Deep South History

The people who lived in towns and cities along the Mississippi River in the southern United States are a special breed, steeped in 500 years of history as rich as the coffee they drink, or the soil where once the river ran. This book is a fast-pace, easy to read history that covers everything from the early conquistadors and the first Mardi Gras to Fannie Lou Hamer and Archie Manning, and covers the geographic region from Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, and Louisiana.

The Mississippi River Campaign, 1861-1863: The Struggle for Control of the Western Waters

Telling the story of the Civil War's Mississippi River Campaign through the experiences of leading officers, ordinary soldiers, and civilians, this book explains how the river campaign came to be one of the key tenets of the Union's strategy and a fundamental contributor to the war's ultimate outcome. It describes the Union's drive down the Mississippi River from Cairo, Illinois, the drive up the river from the Gulf of Mexico, and the capturing of key cities and rebel fortifications along the way, including New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Memphis, Vicksburg, and finally, Port Hudson, Louisiana. The text is supplemented with 24 historical photographs from the Library of Congress and the National Archives.

New Madrid: A Mississippi River Town in History and Legend

New Madrid: A Mississippi River Town in History and Legend focuses on the hearts and minds of a restless population as it moved west into the Mississippi River Valley in the 1800s. The river-port town of New Madrid, Missouri, strategically located just below the junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, and destined to be the capital of 'New Spain,' was en route for thousands of early Americans.
New Madrid's pioneers reveal their past and their stories through letters, newspapers, official records, and other sources. The author takes the reader through the town's history, recounting tales of legendary people whose lives crossed with those of area residents. Lively illustrations, photographs, and maps enhance the stories, a treasure for anyone whose ancestors experienced the westward movement, participated in the Civil War, were slave-owners, slaves, or American Indians, or for those who are curious about American live in earlier times.

Ghosts along the Mississippi River

Some of the nation's most compelling ghost stories owe their origin to "The Father of Waters." Ghosts along the Mississippi River is the first book-length collection of ghost tales from the small towns and bustling cities that have grown up along its banks. The states represented in this book include Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. Unlike most collections of "true" ghost stories, Ghosts along the Mississippi River draws from the folk traditions of the northern and the southern United States. These tales are populated with Federal and Confederate soldiers, Native Indians, wealthy entrepreneurs, actors, college students, hotel owners, preachers, slaves, and planters. According to some paranormal investigators, the large number of ghost stories from the Mississippi's river towns, and from watery sites all over the world, are proof that large bodies of water are conductors of psychic energy. Granted, no concrete proof exists that there is a definite connection between the river and any actual ghosts or spiritual phenomena. What is indisputable, though, is the fact that the ghost stories included in Ghosts along the Mississippi River are an invaluable record of the values, dreams, fears, and lives of the people who have called the river home.

Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi

The author of Bad Land realizes a lifelong dream as he navigates the waters of the Mississippi River in a spartan sixteen-foot motorboat, producing yet another masterpiece of contemporary American travel writing. In the course of his voyage, Raban records the mercurial caprices of the river and the astonishingly varied lives of the people who live along its banks. Whether he is fishing for walleye or hunting coon, discussing theology in Prairie Du Chien or race relations in Memphis, he is an expert observer of the heartyland's estrangement from America's capitals ot power and culture, and its helpless nostalgia for its lost past. Witty, elegaic, and magnificently erudite, Old Glory is as filled with strong currents as the Mississippi itself.

When the Mississippi Ran Backwards: Empire, Intrigue, Murder, and the New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-12

On December 15, 1811, two of Thomas Jefferson's nephews murdered a slave in cold blood and put his body parts into a roaring fire. The evidence would have been destroyed but for a rare act of God — or, as some believed, of the Indian chief Tecumseh.
That same day, the Mississippi River's first steamboat, piloted by Nicholas Roosevelt, powered itself toward New Orleans on its maiden voyage. The sky grew hazy and red, and jolts of electricity flashed in the air. A prophecy by Tecumseh was about to be fulfilled.
He had warned reluctant warrior-tribes that he would stamp his feet and bring down their houses. Sure enough, between December 16, 1811, and late April 1812, a catastrophic series of earthquakes shook the Mississippi River Valley. Of the more than 2,000 tremors that rumbled across the land during this time, three would have measured nearly or greater than 8.0 on the not-yet-devised Richter Scale. Centered in what is now the bootheel region of Missouri, the New Madrid earthquakes were felt as far away as Canada; New York; New Orleans; Washington, D.C.; and the western part of the Missouri River. A million and a half square miles were affected as the earth's surface remained in a state of constant motion for nearly four months. Towns were destroyed, an eighteen-mile-long by five-mile-wide lake was created, and even the Mississippi River temporarily ran backwards.
The quakes uncovered Jefferson's nephews' cruelty and changed the course of the War of 1812 as well as the future of the new republic. In When the Mississippi Ran Backwards, Jay Feldman expertly weaves together the story of the slave murder, the steamboat, Tecumseh, and the war, and brings a forgotten period back to vivid life. Tecumseh's widely believed prophecy, seemingly fulfilled, hastened an unprecedented alliance among southern and northern tribes, who joined the British in a disastrous fight against the U.S. government. By the end of the war, the continental United States was secure against Britain, France, and Spain; the Indians had lost many lives and much land; and Jefferson's nephews were exposed as murderers. The steamboat, which survived the earthquake, was sunk.
When the Mississippi Ran Backwards sheds light on this now-obscure yet pivotal period between the Revolutionary and Civil wars, uncovering the era's dramatic geophysical, political, and military upheavals. Feldman paints a vivid picture of how these powerful earthquakes made an impact on every aspect of frontier life — and why similar catastrophic quakes are guaranteed to recur. When the Mississippi Ran Backwards is popular history at its best.

The Mississippi River Festival (IL) (Images of America)

In 1969, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville initiated a remarkable performing arts series called the Mississippi River Festival. Over 12 summer seasons, between 1969 and 1980, the festival presented 353 events showcasing performers in a variety of musical genres, including classical, chamber, vocal, ragtime, blues, folk, bluegrass, barbershop, country, and rock, as well as dance and theater. During those years, more than one million visitors flocked to the spacious Gyo Obata-designed campus in the countryside near St. Louis. The Mississippi River Festival began as a partnership promoting regional cooperation in the realm of the performing arts. Southern Illinois University Edwardsville invited the St. Louis Symphony to establish residence on campus and to offer a summer season. To host the symphony, the university created an outdoor concert venue within a natural amphitheater by installing a large circus tent, a stage and acoustic shell, and a sophisticated sound system. To appeal to the widest possible audience, the university included contemporary popular musicians in the series. The audacity of the undertaking, the charm of the venue, the popularity of the artists, the excellence of the performances, and the nostalgic memory of warm summer evenings have combined to endow the festival with legendary status among those who attended.

Wicked River: The Mississippi When It Last Ran Wild (Vintage)

A riveting narrative look at one of the most colorful, dangerous, and peculiar places in America's historical landscape: the strange, wonderful, and mysterious Mississippi River of the 19th century.

Beginning in the early 1800s and climaxing with the siege of Vicksburg in 1863, Wicked River brings to life a place where river pirates brushed elbows with future presidents and religious visionaries shared passage with thieves. Here is a minute-by-minute account of Natchez being flattened by a tornado; the St. Louis harbor being crushed by a massive ice floe; hidden, nefarious celebrations of Mardi Gras; and the sinking of the Sultana, the worst naval disaster in American history. Here, too, is the Mississippi itself: gorgeous, perilous, and unpredictable. Masterfully told, Wicked River is an exuberant work of Americana that portrays a forgotten society on the edge of revolutionary change.

Around the Bend: A Mississippi River Adventure

Wildlife photographer, naturalist, and lecturer C.C. Lockwood delivers a dazzling portrait of the Mississippi River, America's most famous waterway. 200 color photographs.

Road Trip USA Great River Road

Professional traveler Jamie Jensen traveled more than 400,000 miles to bring you the best-selling travel guide Road Trip USA. In this focused tour of the Great River Road, Jensen highlights major cities, obscure towns, popular attractions, roadside curiosities, historic sites, and oddball trivia along the Mississippi. Old Man River, Father of Waters, "body of a nation," Big Muddy—by any name the mighty Mississippi River cuts a mythic figure across the American landscape. Exit the interstates and create your own driving adventures with Road Trip USA Great River Road.

Mississippi River,

The Mississippi River

information about the Mississippi River from the American Geographic Society

Mississippi Solo: A River Quest

Since the publication of his first book, Mississippi Solo, Eddy L. Harris has been praised for his travel writing. In this exciting reissue of his classic travelogue, readers will come to treasure the rich insightful prose that is as textured as the Mississippi River itself. They will be taken by the hand by an adventurer whose lifelong dream is to canoe the length of this mighty river, from Minnesota to New Orleans. The trip's dangers were legion for a Black man traveling alone, paddling from "where there ain't no black folks to where they still don't like us much." Barge waives loom large, wild dogs roam the wooded shores, and, in the Arkansas dusk, two shotgun-toting bigots nearly bring the author's dream to a bloody . Sustaining him through the hard weeks of paddling were the hundreds of people who reached out to share a small piece of his challenge. Mississippi Solo is a big, rollicking, brilliant book, a wonderful piece of American adventure, and an unforgettable story of a man testing his own limits.

Down the Mississippi: A Modern-day Huck on America’s River Road

When CNN citizen journalist Neal Moore slid his canoe into the headwaters of the Mississippi River to begin a five-month quest for positive American stories, he was acutely aware of another American who filled his tales with what he saw and heard along the river: Mark Twain. In Down the Mississippi: A Modern-day Huck on America's River Road, Moore introduces us to a cast of ordinary Americans who share steadfast determination in a time of economic uncertainty. As he collects their stories, they begin to claim his. Arriving in Mark Twain's Hannibal, Moore is hailed as a modern-day Huck; which is when he realizes that his story is theirs. From that point on, Moore must accept on board as stowaways the spirits of Mark Twain and Huck Finn as he continues to St. Louis and eventually on to New Orleans, Twain's regular run as a steamboat pilot. Whether interviewing a Delta musician singing the economic blues, an Ojibwe dancer sharing a secret tradition, or an inmate doing 25 to life at The Farm, Moore's stories are imbued with the most common of all American traits: optimism.

Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America

An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known — the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever.
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the Lillian Smith Award.

The Mississippi River in Maps & Views: From Lake Itasca to The Gulf of Mexico

In The Mississippi River in Maps & Views more than eighty glorious full-color maps dating from as early as 1544 celebrate "Ol’ Man River," this profound artery at the heart of America, and the extraordinary cities that grew up on its shores, including New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, and Minneapolis–St. Paul. Beautifully drawn maps document Fernando de Soto’s explorations and "discovery" of the river, as well as those of the Marquett and Joliet Expeditions. Other maps present key moments along the Mississippi in times of war (The French and Indian War, The War of 1812, The Civil War). More recent though equally artful maps and charts seek a scientific understanding of the river toward an end of controlling it, and gorgeous bird’s-eye views ultimately extol the river’s beauty and its environs above all else. A consideration of the Mississippi and its history as a major highway toward America’s discovery of itself, through a comprehensive selection of the most beautiful maps dealing with it, will give new insight to the complex—sometimes nostalgic, sometimes practical—relationship of this country to its most storied river.

Mississippi River